Forexcargodeals – Balikbayan Services

Saw this pro-Duterte post in FB.. Anyone here wiling to debunk or verify the list below?

(THIS IS WHAT MY FB FRIEND POST NOT MINE) Reason why Yellows destabilizes the Duterte Administration
  1. PH external debt sheds $5.2B as of June 2017.
  2. Highest PSEi closed at all-time high 8,691.52 as of 2/20/18
  3. Crime rate in Manila drops by 38% for the past 12 months.
  4. Duterte's Political Will costs: 6B from Lucio Tan, 1.7B w/o Tax from Mile Long Property and 25B from Mighty Cigarettes
  5. Free tuition in SUCs
  6. Free internet in public places
  7. The more immediate, responsible and reasonable responses/reactions/actions of authority on "men on duty" (police officers, tanods, etc) to maintain quality of services and image of the people in charge of public safety.
  8. Driver's license validity extension to five years
  9. Stiffer penalties for hospitals refusing to treat patients
  10. The indefinite ceasefire between the MNLF, MILF, CPP NDF and the government (held in Norway)
  11. The centralised complaint and action hotlines - 911 and 8888
  12. The one stop shop for OFW in POEA which is way better than before
  13. The removal of processing fee on travel tax exemption
  14. The 2,000 pesos SSS pension raise
  15. The much empowered servicemen who are now willing to serve the country with pride and higher self esteem
  16. The servicemen's one in a million dinner at Malacanang opportunity
  17. The rounds in all of the defense camps to see what each station needs so that they can give better service to the country
  18. The shutdown/closure of some mining companies that destroy the country's natural resources
  19. The removal of the fishing fences in Manila Bay to give other small fishermen a fair chance to use it for their livelihood
  20. The new buses from the airport to many major hubs in nearby cities
  21. The one sack rice added to 4Ps cash assistance to our less fortunate fellowmen
  22. The salary increase of the servicemen which is bound to happen any moment soon - and the soon to be state of the art equipped hospital for them.
  23. The hastened benefits claiming of the family of our fallen men
  24. The increased allowance of our olympics delegates
  25. The immediate signing of Freedom of Information
  26. The exposés against local executives, police generals, judges and other top officials in government 27.The now better looking cleaner Baclaran, Divisoria and other public places
  27. The employment increase and unemployment decrease
  28. The exposés against olligarchs who have been evading to pay taxes
  29. The lower street crimes because most of the nutters who are more likely to commit the crimes have already surrendered and therefore identified
  30. The Mindanao peace process that has resumed again in Malaysia
  31. The bilateral talks with China over the WPS dispute
  32. The launch of Oplan Tokhang which has more positive results - including the not so good ones
  33. The cooperation and openness of fenced elite subdivisions for Oplan Tokhang as they show support to the war on drugs campaign
  34. The billions worth of drugs seized in the operation
  35. The closure of so many drug labs all over the country
  36. The more regulated and SAF manned BUCOR
  37. The no VIP treatment for government officials in airports
  38. The ongoing improvements of MRT/LRT service and other major thoroughfares
  39. The customs installation of CCTVs all over the place to promote transparency
  40. The crackdown of Bilibid Drug Trade and the expose' of Lielie de Lima
  41. DFA is now faster in processing passports.
  42. Fixers are now out of sight
  43. End of Contractualization
  44. No more age limit requirements to all job seekers.
  45. The closure of online gambling. From 4 thousand outlets during the arroyo admin, to 8 thousand outlets during Aquino admin
  46. OEC exemption for OFWs returning to same employer! Finally no need to pay and go through the troublesome process of acquiring OEC.
  47. The extension of passport validity to 10 years
  48. The curfew hours for minors.
  49. free tuition in state universities and colleges for Filipino undergraduate students starting Academic Year 2017-2018;
  50. free irrigation;
  51. free medical assistance in six hospitals that offer the Libreng Gamot Para sa Masa (Lingap) program which benefited some 9,429 indigents (from March to June 9);
  52. microfinancing assistance that gives Pondo sa Pagbabago at Pag-asenso (P3) program for the underprivileged Filipino entrepreneurs, with Mindoro, Leyte, and Sarangani as pilot provinces;
  53. additional P600 rice subsidy to each Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) household beneficiary;
  54. strict enforcement of labor laws particularly on security of tenure, which saw the regularization of 45,605 workers (from July 2016 to March 2017);
  55. across-the-board increase in the monthly pension of more than two-million Social Security System (SSS) retirees;
  56. awarding of Certificates of Land Ownership Award (CLOAs) to Hacienda Luisita farmers starting with 111 beneficiaries, as of February 2017; and
  57. fast-tracking the rehabilitation of Yolanda-affected areas with the construction of 50,791 housing units and 1,790 new classrooms and the repair of 701 state colleges and universities, 38 airport facilities, and 27 seaport facilities, as of the first quarter of 2017. 59 implementation of the Freedom of Information (FOI) in the Executive Branch; 60 creation of 8888 Citizen's Complaint Hotline for erring government officials; 61 online streaming of closed-circuit television (CCTV) inside the offices at the Bure59au of Customs (BOC); 62 social media livestreams of the President’s activities and Palace briefings; 63 the creation of a presidential task force on media security; 64 reduction of processing days of business permits and licenses (down to 2 days for new business registration and 1 day for renewals), Tax Clearance Certificates (TCC) (down to 2 working days from submission of complete documents), and certificates authorizing registration (down to 5 days from the previous 10 days); 65 extension of the validity of driver’s licenses from 3 years to 5 years; 66 implementation of a 3-day maximum time for Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA) applications; and 67 establishment of a one-stop service center for OFWs.
  58. The distribution of the agricultural equipment that were purchased by the previous government but weren't distributed for some political reasons
  59. The immediate repatriation of stranded OFWs in Saudi Arabia (which if I remember it right, one Kuya was crying when he finally touched base simply because he could now be reunited with his loved ones because those who were sent by the previous government only visited them to have some selfies with them.)
  60. The laglag bala at the airport has finally stopped right after PRRD took office. I personally experienced that worry free moment and noticed that no more luggages with plastic wraps.
  61. The services in the government agencies are much faster and employees have started to treat the people with some respect and even with a smile. The transactions are much better these days.
  62. The legit balikbayan boxes are no longer mishandled.
  63. Memorandum Circular 25 directing the display of visual representations of Philippine Heroes in lieu of elected or appointed government officials.
  64. Removal of giving scheduled passport renewal slots fo travel agencies.
  65. The opening of the DAR gates which where were closed for 18 years
  66. The distribution of the long overdue Hacienda Luisita to the farmers
  67. The irrigation projects for the farmers have already started and nationwide - not to mention the distribution of many boats for our fishermen too.
  68. The almost 700,000 surrenderees who have realized that drugs won't give them the future they're hoping for.
  69. The death of the two topmost terrorists Hapilon and Maute signifies the great leadership of PRRD. It's history.
YOU SEE, THE YELLOWS ARE NOT PRO-FILIPINO! GISING NA BAYAN! HUWAG NA MAGPALOKO SA MGA DILAWAN!
submitted by wandordando to Philippines [link] [comments]

All the lies in one post

Okay, somebody actually collated all the lies the ka-DDS are trying to promote online... medyo masakit basahin especially since oorbit ang kilay mo. You'd roll your eyes so hard and so often that you'd be able to see your brains.
Masaya ito i-debunk.
Reason why Yellows destabilizes the Duterte Administration
  1. PH external debt sheds $5.2B as of June 2017.
  2. Highest PSEi closed at all-time high 8,497.74.
  3. Crime rate in Manila drops by 38% for the past 12 months.
  4. Duterte's Political Will costs: 6B from Lucio Tan, 1.7B w/o Tax from Mile Long Property and 25B from Mighty Cigarettes
  5. Free tuition in SUCs
  6. Free internet in public places
  7. The more immediate, responsible and reasonable responses/reactions/actions of authority on "men on duty" (police officers, tanods, etc) to maintain quality of services and image of the people in charge of public safety.
  8. Driver's license validity extension to five years
  9. Stiffer penalties for hospitals refusing to treat patients
  10. The indefinite ceasefire between the MNLF, MILF, CPP NDF and the government (held in Norway)
  11. The centralised complaint and action hotlines - 911 and 8888
  12. The one stop shop for OFW in POEA which is way better than before
  13. The removal of processing fee on travel tax exemption
  14. The 2,000 pesos SSS pension raise
  15. The much empowered servicemen who are now willing to serve the country with pride and higher self esteem
  16. The servicemen's one in a million dinner at Malacanang opportunity
  17. The rounds in all of the defense camps to see what each station needs so that they can give better service to the country
  18. The shutdown/closure of some mining companies that destroy the country's natural resources
  19. The removal of the fishing fences in Manila Bay to give other small fishermen a fair chance to use it for their livelihood
  20. The new buses from the airport to many major hubs in nearby cities
  21. The one sack rice added to 4Ps cash assistance to our less fortunate fellowmen
  22. The salary increase of the servicemen which is bound to happen any moment soon - and the soon to be state of the art equipped hospital for them.
  23. The hastened benefits claiming of the family of our fallen men
  24. The increased allowance of our olympics delegates
  25. The immediate signing of Freedom of Information
  26. The exposés against local executives, police generals, judges and other top officials in government
  27. The now better looking cleaner Baclaran, Divisoria and other public places
  28. The employment increase and unemployment decrease
  29. The exposés against olligarchs who have been evading to pay taxes
  30. The lower street crimes because most of the nutters who are more likely to commit the crimes have already surrendered and therefore identified
  31. The Mindanao peace process that has resumed again in Malaysia
  32. The bilateral talks with China over the WPS dispute
  33. The launch of Oplan Tokhang which has more positive results - including the not so good ones
  34. The cooperation and openness of fenced elite subdivisions for Oplan Tokhang as they show support to the war on drugs campaign
  35. The billions worth of drugs seized in the operation
  36. The closure of so many drug labs all over the country
  37. The more regulated and SAF manned BUCOR
  38. The no VIP treatment for government officials in airports
  39. The ongoing improvements of MRT/LRT service and other major thoroughfares
  40. The customs installation of CCTVs all over the place to promote transparency
  41. The crackdown of Bilibid Drug Trade and the expose' of Lielie de Lima
  42. DFA is now faster in processing passports.
  43. Fixers are now out of sight
  44. End of Contractualization
  45. No more age limit requirements to all job seekers.
  46. The closure of online gambling. From 4 thousand outlets during the arroyo admin, to 8 thousand outlets during Aquino admin
  47. OEC exemption for OFWs returning to same employer! Finally no need to pay and go through the troublesome process of acquiring OEC.
  48. The extension of passport validity to 10 years
  49. The curfew hours for minors.
  50. free tuition in state universities and colleges for Filipino undergraduate students starting Academic Year 2017-2018;
  51. free irrigation;
  52. free medical assistance in six hospitals that offer the Libreng Gamot Para sa Masa (Lingap) program which benefited some 9,429 indigents (from March to June 9);
  53. microfinancing assistance that gives Pondo sa Pagbabago at Pag-asenso (P3) program for the underprivileged Filipino entrepreneurs, with Mindoro, Leyte, and Sarangani as pilot provinces;
  54. additional P600 rice subsidy to each Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) household beneficiary;
  55. strict enforcement of labor laws particularly on security of tenure, which saw the regularization of 45,605 workers (from July 2016 to March 2017);
  56. across-the-board increase in the monthly pension of more than two-million Social Security System (SSS) retirees;
  57. awarding of Certificates of Land Ownership Award (CLOAs) to Hacienda Luisita farmers starting with 111 beneficiaries, as of February 2017; and
  58. fast-tracking the rehabilitation of Yolanda-affected areas with the construction of 50,791 housing units and 1,790 new classrooms and the repair of 701 state colleges and universities, 38 airport facilities, and 27 seaport facilities, as of the first quarter of 2017.
  59. implementation of the Freedom of Information (FOI) in the Executive Branch;
  60. creation of 8888 Citizen's Complaint Hotline for erring government officials;
  61. online streaming of closed-circuit television (CCTV) inside the offices at the Bure59au of Customs (BOC);
  62. social media livestreams of the President’s activities and Palace briefings;
  63. the creation of a presidential task force on media security;
  64. reduction of processing days of business permits and licenses (down to 2 days for new business registration and 1 day for renewals), Tax Clearance Certificates (TCC) (down to 2 working days from submission of complete documents), and certificates authorizing registration (down to 5 days from the previous 10 days);
  65. extension of the validity of driver’s licenses from 3 years to 5 years;
  66. implementation of a 3-day maximum time for Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA) applications; and
  67. establishment of a one-stop service center for OFWs.
  68. The distribution of the agricultural equipment that were purchased by the previous government but weren't distributed for some political reasons
  69. The immediate repatriation of stranded OFWs in Saudi Arabia (which if I remember it right, one Kuya was crying when he finally touched base simply because he could now be reunited with his loved ones because those who were sent by the previous government only visited them to have some selfies with them.)
  70. The laglag bala at the airport has finally stopped right after PRRD took office. I personally experienced that worry free moment and noticed that no more luggages with plastic wraps.
  71. The services in the government agencies are much faster and employees have started to treat the people with some respect and even with a smile. The transactions are much better these days.
  72. The legit balikbayan boxes are no longer mishandled.
  73. Memorandum Circular 25 directing the display of visual representations of Philippine Heroes in lieu of elected or appointed government officials.
  74. Removal of giving scheduled passport renewal slots fo travel agencies.
  75. The opening of the DAR gates which where were closed for 18 years
  76. The distribution of the long overdue Hacienda Luisita to the farmers
  77. The irrigation projects for the farmers have already started and nationwide - not to mention the distribution of many boats for our fishermen too.
  78. The almost 700,000 surrenderees who have realized that drugs won't give them the future they're hoping for.
  79. The death of the two topmost terrorists Hapilon and Maute signifies the great leadership of PRRD. It's history.
YOU SEE, THE YELLOWS ARE NOT PRO-FILIPINO! GISING NA BAYAN! HUWAG NA MAGPALOKO SA MGA DILAWAN!
submitted by merdionesmondragon to Philippines [link] [comments]

Reasons why yellows destabalize the duterte government

Saw this on FB. Wanted to share here.
  1. PH external debt sheds $5.2B as of June 2017.
  2. Highest PSEi closed at all-time high 8,497.74.
  3. Crime rate in Manila drops by 38% for the past 12 months.
  4. Duterte's Political Will costs: 6B from Lucio Tan, 1.7B w/o Tax from Mile Long Property and 25B from Mighty Cigarettes
  5. Free tuition in SUCs
  6. Free internet in public places
  7. The more immediate, responsible and reasonable responses/reactions/actions of authority on "men on duty" (police officers, tanods, etc) to maintain quality of services and image of the people in charge of public safety.
  8. Driver's license validity extension to five years
  9. Stiffer penalties for hospitals refusing to treat patients
  10. The indefinite ceasefire between the MNLF, MILF, CPP NDF and the government (held in Norway)
  11. The centralised complaint and action hotlines - 911 and 8888
  12. The one stop shop for OFW in POEA which is way better than before
  13. The removal of processing fee on travel tax exemption
  14. The 2,000 pesos SSS pension raise
  15. The much empowered servicemen who are now willing to serve the country with pride and higher self esteem
  16. The servicemen's one in a million dinner at Malacanang opportunity
  17. The rounds in all of the defense camps to see what each station needs so that they can give better service to the country
  18. The shutdown/closure of some mining companies that destroy the country's natural resources
  19. The removal of the fishing fences in Manila Bay to give other small fishermen a fair chance to use it for their livelihood
  20. The new buses from the airport to many major hubs in nearby cities
  21. The one sack rice added to 4Ps cash assistance to our less fortunate fellowmen
  22. The salary increase of the servicemen which is bound to happen any moment soon - and the soon to be state of the art equipped hospital for them.
  23. The hastened benefits claiming of the family of our fallen men
  24. The increased allowance of our olympics delegates
  25. The immediate signing of Freedom of Information
  26. The exposés against local executives, police generals, judges and other top officials in government 27.The now better looking cleaner Baclaran, Divisoria and other public places
  27. The employment increase and unemployment decrease
  28. The exposés against olligarchs who have been evading to pay taxes
  29. The lower street crimes because most of the nutters who are more likely to commit the crimes have already surrendered and therefore identified
  30. The Mindanao peace process that has resumed again in Malaysia
  31. The bilateral talks with China over the WPS dispute
  32. The launch of Oplan Tokhang which has more positive results - including the not so good ones
  33. The cooperation and openness of fenced elite subdivisions for Oplan Tokhang as they show support to the war on drugs campaign
  34. The billions worth of drugs seized in the operation
  35. The closure of so many drug labs all over the country
  36. The more regulated and SAF manned BUCOR
  37. The no VIP treatment for government officials in airports
  38. The ongoing improvements of MRT/LRT service and other major thoroughfares
  39. The customs installation of CCTVs all over the place to promote transparency
  40. The crackdown of Bilibid Drug Trade and the expose' of Lielie de Lima
  41. DFA is now faster in processing passports.
  42. Fixers are now out of sight
  43. End of Contractualization
  44. No more age limit requirements to all job seekers.
  45. The closure of online gambling. From 4 thousand outlets during the arroyo admin, to 8 thousand outlets during Aquino admin
  46. OEC exemption for OFWs returning to same employer! Finally no need to pay and go through the troublesome process of acquiring OEC.
  47. The extension of passport validity to 10 years
  48. The curfew hours for minors.
  49. free tuition in state universities and colleges for Filipino undergraduate students starting Academic Year 2017-2018;
  50. free irrigation;
  51. free medical assistance in six hospitals that offer the Libreng Gamot Para sa Masa (Lingap) program which benefited some 9,429 indigents (from March to June 9);
  52. microfinancing assistance that gives Pondo sa Pagbabago at Pag-asenso (P3) program for the underprivileged Filipino entrepreneurs, with Mindoro, Leyte, and Sarangani as pilot provinces;
  53. additional P600 rice subsidy to each Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) household beneficiary;
  54. strict enforcement of labor laws particularly on security of tenure, which saw the regularization of 45,605 workers (from July 2016 to March 2017);
  55. across-the-board increase in the monthly pension of more than two-million Social Security System (SSS) retirees;
  56. awarding of Certificates of Land Ownership Award (CLOAs) to Hacienda Luisita farmers starting with 111 beneficiaries, as of February 2017; and
  57. fast-tracking the rehabilitation of Yolanda-affected areas with the construction of 50,791 housing units and 1,790 new classrooms and the repair of 701 state colleges and universities, 38 airport facilities, and 27 seaport facilities, as of the first quarter of 2017. 59 implementation of the Freedom of Information (FOI) in the Executive Branch; 60 creation of 8888 Citizen's Complaint Hotline for erring government officials; 61 online streaming of closed-circuit television (CCTV) inside the offices at the Bure59au of Customs (BOC); 62 social media livestreams of the President’s activities and Palace briefings; 63 the creation of a presidential task force on media security; 64 reduction of processing days of business permits and licenses (down to 2 days for new business registration and 1 day for renewals), Tax Clearance Certificates (TCC) (down to 2 working days from submission of complete documents), and certificates authorizing registration (down to 5 days from the previous 10 days); 65 extension of the validity of driver’s licenses from 3 years to 5 years; 66 implementation of a 3-day maximum time for Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA) applications; and 67 establishment of a one-stop service center for OFWs.
  58. The distribution of the agricultural equipment that were purchased by the previous government but weren't distributed for some political reasons
  59. The immediate repatriation of stranded OFWs in Saudi Arabia (which if I remember it right, one Kuya was crying when he finally touched base simply because he could now be reunited with his loved ones because those who were sent by the previous government only visited them to have some selfies with them.)
  60. The laglag bala at the airport has finally stopped right after PRRD took office. I personally experienced that worry free moment and noticed that no more luggages with plastic wraps.
  61. The services in the government agencies are much faster and employees have started to treat the people with some respect and even with a smile. The transactions are much better these days.
  62. The legit balikbayan boxes are no longer mishandled.
  63. Memorandum Circular 25 directing the display of visual representations of Philippine Heroes in lieu of elected or appointed government officials.
  64. Removal of giving scheduled passport renewal slots fo travel agencies.
  65. The opening of the DAR gates which where were closed for 18 years
  66. The distribution of the long overdue Hacienda Luisita to the farmers
  67. The irrigation projects for the farmers have already started and nationwide - not to mention the distribution of many boats for our fishermen too.
  68. The almost 700,000 surrenderees who have realized that drugs won't give them the future they're hoping for.
  69. The death of the two topmost terrorists Hapilon and Maute signifies the great leadership of PRRD. It's history.
YOU SEE, THE YELLOWS ARE NOT PRO-FILIPINO! GISING NA BAYAN! HUWAG NA MAGPALOKO SA MGA DILAWAN!
submitted by nomercy253 to Philippines [link] [comments]

Two Essays on Retiring in the Philippines (long read)

TRAPPED BETWEEN CULTURES: Neither Filipino Nor American Eugenio Amparo, MD
I was born in the Philippines to Filipino parents but I have lived continuously in America since 1974, the year I started my diagnostic radiology residency at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Now, having retired from the practice of medicine, I find myself with too much time to contemplate everything from quantum mechanics, the existence of God in a fundamentally random universe seemingly full of suffering, to the history of the bra and the deforestation of pubic hair. One of these contemplations led to an uncomfortable conclusion, that I am neither Filipino nor American, that I am trapped between cultures.
As a child in Iloilo City, I used to dream of America with rivers of cars, supermarkets overflowing with food, snow in the winter, everything I saw in movies. Now, I have a BMW and a Mercedes Benz in a three-car garage; a refrigerator full of food as well as obesity and hypercholesterolemia; pictures from family ski trips to Aspen, Vail, Squaw Valley; and a loneliness that is as American as apple pie. I miss the Philippines.

When I visit the Philippines to see friends and relatives, I envy their close family and friendship ties, which is not just an artifact of my visit and a testament to their hospitality. Even when I'm not there, my first cousins, who live in different cities in Metro Manila, get together every Sunday for lunch in Quezon City. By contrast, I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times I got together in the past ten years with my younger brother in Virginia and my sister in Oregon. My daughter lives in San Francisco, a two-hour drive from our home in Sacramento but we see her once or twice every two months. My son and grandchildren live in Folsom, a twenty-minute drive away, but we all have to make a conscious effort to get together once a week. Americans are just too busy, which is the reason America is the greatest economic power in the world and the reason Americans are one of the loneliest people in the world with a very high prevalence of depression. I am not American enough to resign myself to loneliness as a consequence of a national obsession with rugged individualism and self sufficiency.

I am not American enough to resign myself to loneliness…

The solution seems simple; I retire in the Philippines. But then I remember that it now takes almost as long to drive from the University of the Philippines in Quezon City to the Philippine General Hospital, a distance of 11 miles, as it takes to drive from Sacramento to San Francisco, a distance of 87 miles. That's because Manila traffic is so gridlocked. I'm no longer Filipino enough to be patient with Manila traffic.
In America, I bank online and I get cash from ATMs. In the Philippines people still go to banks just to conduct business that can be conducted online or at ATMs. Dealing with government bureaucracies in America like the Department of Motor Vehicles or the Internal Revenue Service can be frustrating, but at least it can be done without having to bribe anyone, whereas the simplest business dealings in the Philippines may require bribes. I still remember a time when visiting the Philippines from America required knowledge of how to bribe customs officials upon arrival at the airport. I once arrived at the Manila International Airport and declared all my scuba gear equipment. The customs officials at first salivated at the thought of how much money they would make from me and then realized I was a hopeless case and finally waved me through. They figured no idiot would declare all of that and know how to bribe his way through, so no bribes were forthcoming. Our medical school alumni association in America once sent a cargo container full of supplies for donation to the Philippine General Hospital (PGH). It was confiscated by customs and it was not released to the PGH until several politicians had intervened. I would not be surprised if it also required bribes to customs officials. Airport customs has vastly improved, probably to encourage tourism and visits from “balikbayans,” but I'm told that conducting business in the Philippines still routinely involves bribery.
When I sit poolside at the Manila Polo Club I think the Club may be the ultimate blend of American and Filipino: clean and well organized; efficient and courteous service; a feeling of Filipino closeness as well as American aloofness. Then I remember that the Manila Polo Club is an exclusive enclave. It is not the Philippines, which brings me to yet another glaring problem. I am no longer Filipino enough to ignore the yawning chasm between rich and poor in the Philippines. A few minutes drive from the Manila Polo Club with its Benzes and BMWs, street children run up to cars and beg for coins. You see tin and cardboard shanties where children live. If you are driving at night in the provinces, an unnerving darkness seems to swallow up the small villages you pass. I'm now too American to ignore all this, although I barely noticed it when I lived in the Philippines.
And I have become too soft in America. I find myself sweating profusely when I visit the humid Philippines because Sacramento is so dry sweat evaporates even when the temperature approaches 100 degrees F. I no longer scoff at golfers in the Philippines hiring umbrella girls to protect them from the sun, although I suspect that is not the only reason umbrella girls populate Filipino golf courses. As a child in the Philippines, I was so dirty I had to be periodically dewormed. Now, I seem germophobic when I visit the Philippines. I also get traveler's diarrhea every time I visit so I have to watch what I eat. My stomach has become too American but I still long for bamboo shoots, hearts of palm, dinuguan, lechon, and talaba. This part is likely just a matter of acclimatization.

What isn't a matter of acclimatization is my feeling of anxiety in the Philippines regarding emergency services. In America I have been lulled into the feeling that I can always call 911 for police, firemen or paramedics and they will come in time and I can trust them. Past emergencies in America have taught me that this is generally true. I don't feel that way in the Philippines. I see armed guards everywhere in the Philippines, outside gated communities, in bank lobbies, and even in a noodle restaurant. It seems that no one really expects the police to be of any help against criminals. I don't see how an ambulance can possibly make it through Manila traffic and I remember being a clinical clerk in the emergency room of the Philippine General Hospital (PGH). I would fear for my life if I were brought there, although I'm told much has improved at the PGH.

I am no longer Filipinos enough to be patient with gridlocked Manila traffic….

I have lived so long in America, a developed country, that I have grown accustomed to efficiency and punctuality, reliable emergency services, above board business dealings, and the abundance of creature comforts. As a consequence, I am no longer Filipino enough to be patient with gridlocked Manila traffic, to take my chances with unreliable emergency services, to conduct business that may require bribery, and to get used to the discomforts and the visible poverty of a developing country. Yet, I am also too Filipino to ignore the aching loneliness of the American way of life, too Filipino not to envy the close family and friendship ties I see when I visit the Philippines. I am trapped between cultures, neither Filipino nor American. 17
Gene A
This article was written by a Filipino-American serviceman who was planning to retire in his native land after completing his US military service, but changed his mind. Are his reasons not to retire in the Philippines valid? Why I Won’t Live in the Philippines Anymore
I’ll be 42 this year, it’ll be quite a while before I retire. But sometimes the topic of where to retire comes up in conversations when I’m with older friends, or among my peers who are in the military & will retire after they fulfill their 20 years of active duty service. Most of the Filipinos I talk to say that they’d retire in the US, not in the Philippines. I ask them why, considering that because of the favorable exchange rate, they could retire comfortably in the Philippines. We have some common answers, which I’ll elaborate on below.
Now before I go further, let me say that the US is not perfect, no country is. But in spite of its flaws, I’d rather live here. I cannot speak for my friends, but here are the reasons why I no longer want to live in the Philippines & prefer instead to live & retire here in the USA:
Bangko ng bayan – If you retire in the Philippines, some of your relatives, friends, even neighbors will come and ‘borrow’ or ask money from you. There’s always some sort of medical emergency going on or a child who needs tuition money. They will approach you too if they need money for a birthday party, baptism, wedding or burial. If you say no, ikaw pang masama. And don’t expect them to repay you if you do lend money.
Security issues – I think no matter how simple you live, word will get around that you’re receiving some sort of retirement income from the US or abroad. You could become an easy target of ‘akyat-bahay’ gangs or kidnappings, either by strangers or by disgruntled people you didn’t lend money to.
No 911 or emergency services – unlike here in the US where you can call 911 and an ambulance will be there in a few minutes, in the Philippines, no such emergency service exists. Even if there were, with the traffic in large metropolitan areas like Manila, by the time the ambulance does reach you and transport you to the hospital, you’d probably be dead or close to death by then. And if you don’t have any health insurance, I doubt you’ll be taken care of.
Corruption – things happen faster if you bribe people. I clearly remember hearing that it takes years for people to get a phone line, but the process could be speeded up if you knew someone at the phone company. Those who have drivers licenses, what’s the percentage that they actually took both a written & practical driving test? At almost every contact I had with the government, things were slow & people would ‘offer’ to speed things up for me if I paid a little extra, which I refused.
Pollution – during my last year in the Philippines, I would get a sore throat every 6 weeks or so from the dirty air I was exposed to while riding tricycles & jeepneys. It was so bad that I had barely any voice left, and my voice was needed because I constantly spoke with people at work. Except for the tourist spots & business districts, most areas you went there was trash on the streets. It’s a common sight for people to just throw candy wrappers anywhere, further clogging the drains which contributes to the floods whenever it rains in Manila There are no trash cans or dumpsters to speak of. Some men will urinate at the nearest wall instead of looking for a public restroom. Signs like “bawal umihi dito” and “bawal magtapon ng basura dito” are ignored.
Traffic – what would normally take 15-20 minutes to navigate will take an hour or more because of the traffic. I do not want to deal with that. I remember when I was still working in the Philippines, I had co-workers who would leave home at 5:30 or 6 am & get to work just in time at 7:30 or 8:00 am. And rules of the road? I am embarrassed to say we have some of the most undisciplined drivers I’ve ever seen.
The laws are less female friendly
In the Philippines, if you have a child and your husband or boyfriend ran off with someone else or simply abandoned you & your child, sorry ka na lang. Here in the States, even if you’re not married to the guy, there are laws in place. He is legally, not to mention morally, obligated to support his child. You can take him to court for child support & since everything here in the US is connected to one’s social security number, if he’s working, he can be tracked down & his wages will be garnished (automatically deducted) from his paycheck & sent to you. If he stops working, once he does find work again, he now owes you back payments & he will legally have to pay that on top of whatever court ordered child support in place.
I don’t know how seriously domestic violence is treated in the Philippines, but here, if a guy merely pushes you, or even talks to you in a threatening or demeaning manner, you can call 911 on him for domestic abuse or violence. It will go on his record, & he could get into serious trouble especially if he’s in the US military.
I have many fond memories of the Philippines. I have many friends there that I keep in touch with via email, fb or skype, & I can see them when I visit. It is where I was born, & where I lived from the ages of 9-28. The Philippines will always be a nice place to visit, but it’s not where I want to live anymore. And unless a lot of things change for the better, I have no intentions of going back there to live.
submitted by CoolerRon to Philippines [link] [comments]

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